Looking Back in Time – 1 Day Trip

3rd – 5th Grade
Historical Journey of the People along the Loxahatchee River
 



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  • Canoe the Loxahatchee River
  • Realize the Importance of the River on Human Settlement
  • Understand the Significance of the Second Seminole War on America
  • Explore Recreated Homesteads-Seminole and Pioneer
  • Plant Identification and Uses by Humans
  • Record Data in Journals

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Students will become “Wildlife Biologists” and “Historians” as they spend an exciting day exploring the Loxahatchee River and surrounding woods and fields at Riverbend and Loxahatchee River Battlefield Park. On the calm and tree lined river, we will master the skills of canoeing, study the ecological relationships between organisms and understand the importance of rivers on human settlement. We’ll identify native plants and discover their benefits to the Native Americans and pioneers. As we follow a trail through the forest canopy, we will observe animals by sight and sound and spy the remnants of old homesteads and other archeological remains. Heading to the site of the last standing battle in the Second Seminole War Students we’ll travel in the footsteps of Seminole warriors and Tennessee volunteers. We will head back to school reflecting on our adventures and completing a Seminole inspired craft!

Sunshine State Standards following grades 3-12

Students will:

  1. Learn the importance of recording data in a field journal, with an emphasis on the value of each person’s contribution to the total body of scientific observations and the effort to compare and contrast their findings with those of other students
  2. SC.3.N.1.3 Keep records as appropriate, such as pictorial, written, or simple charts and graphs, of investigations conducted.

    SC.3.N.1.7 Explain that empirical evidence is information, such as observations or measurements that is used to help validate explanations of natural phenomena.

    SC.3.N.1.1 Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them individually and in teams through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

    SC.4.N.1.1 Raise questions about the natural world, use appropriate reference materials that support understanding to obtain information (identifying the source), conduct both individual and team investigations through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

    SC.4.N.1.4 Attempt reasonable answers to scientific questions and cite evidence in support.

    SC.4.N.1.6 Keep records that describe observations made, carefully distinguishing actual observations from ideas and inferences about the observations.

    SC.4.N.1.7 Recognize and explain that scientists base their explanations on evidence.

    SC.5.N.1.1 Define a problem, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigations of various types such as: systematic observations, experiments requiring the identification of variables, collecting and organizing data, interpreting data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.

    SC.5.N.1.6 Recognize and explain the difference between personal opinion/interpretation and verified observation.

    SC.5.N.2.1 Recognize and explain that science is grounded in empirical observations that are testable; explanation must always be linked with evidence.

  3. Understand the concept that the presence of certain plants are an indication of events that are occurring, noting that they have adaptations that allow them to live in certain areas, with a focus on exotic species, like water lettuce
  4. SC.3.N.1.6 Infer based on observation.

    SC.4.L.17.1 Compare the seasonal changes in Florida plants and animals to those in other regions of the country.

    SC.5.L.15.1 Describe how, when the environment changes, differences between individuals allow some plants and animals to survive and reproduce while others die or move to new locations.

    SC.5.N.2.1 Recognize and explain that science is grounded in empirical observations that are testable; explanation must always be linked with evidence.

    SS.5.G.3.1 Describe the impact that past natural events have had on human and physical environments in the United States through 1850.

  5. Identify and understand different organisms and their unique structures, functions and environmental adaptations
  6. SC.3.L.15.1 Classify animals into major groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates, those having live births and those which lay eggs) according to their physical characteristics and behaviors.

    SC.4.L.16.2 Explain that although characteristics of plants and animals are inherited, some characteristics can be affected by the environment.

    SC.5.L.14.2 Compare and contrast the function of organs and other physical structures of plants and animals, including humans, for example: some animals have skeletons for support – some with internal skeletons others with exoskeletons – while some plants have stems for support.

    SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.

  7. Understand the importance of green spaces and the preservation of archeological finds like ruins or battlefields to better understand the past
  8. SS.3.G.3.2 Describe the natural resources in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

    SS.3.G.4.1 Explain how the environment influences settlement patterns in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

    SS.3.G.4.2 Identify the cultures that have settled the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

    SS.4.A.1.1 Analyze primary and secondary resources to identify significant individuals and events throughout Florida history.

    SS.4.A.2.1 Compare Native American tribes in Florida.

    SS.4.A.3.10 Identify the causes and effects of the Seminole Wars.

    SS.4.A.3.2 Describe causes and effects of European colonization on the Native American tribes of Florida.

    SS.4.A.3.8 Explain how the Seminole tribe formed and the purpose for their migration.

    SS.5.A.1.2 Utilize timelines to identify and discuss American History time periods.

  9. Understand the significance of human actions, including their own, in the protection of natural resources such as water and its pollution and redirection
  10. SC.4.L.17.4 Recognize ways plants and animals, including humans, can impact the environment.

    SS.4.A.8.4 Explain how tourism affects Florida’s economy and growth.

    SS.4.C.2.2 Identify ways citizens work together to influence government and help solve community and state problems.

    SS.4.E.1.2 Explain Florida’s role in the national and international economy and conditions that attract businesses to the state.

    SS.5.C.2.5 Identify ways good citizens go beyond basic civic and political responsibilities to improve government and society.

  11. Understand the history and cultural significance of the Seminole tribe, with a focus on their traditional relationship with the natural environment
  12. SS.3.G.2.6 Investigate how people perceive places and regions differently by conducting interviews, mental mapping, and studying news, poems, legends, and songs about a region or area.

    SS.3.G.3.2 Describe the natural resources in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

    SS.3.G.4.1 Explain how the environment influences settlement patterns in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

    SS.3.G.4.2 Identify the cultures that have settled the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

    SS.4.A.2.1 Compare Native American tribes in Florida.

    SC.4.L.17.2 Explain that animals, including humans, cannot make their own food and that when animals eat plants or other animals, the energy stored in the food source is passed to them.

    SS.5.A.2.3 Compare cultural aspects of Native American tribes from different geographic regions of North America including but not limited to clothing, shelter, food, major beliefs and practices, music, art, and interactions with the environment.

    SS.5.A.3.2 Investigate (nationality, sponsoring country, motives, dates and routes of travel, accomplishments) the European explorers.

    SS.5.A.3.3 Describe interactions among Native Americans, Africans, English, French, Dutch, and Spanish for control of North America.

    SS.5.A.4.1 Identify the economic, political and socio-cultural motivation for colonial settlement.

    SS.5.E.2.1 Recognize the positive and negative effects of voluntary trade among Native Americans, European explorers, and colonists.

Pricing:

  • $65.00 per student
  • Based on a minimum of 36 students and a maximum of 48 students
  • Based on Broward county departure.
  • Includes coach transportation, instruction, and equipment